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Contractor sentenced after householder exposed to asbestos

Date:
7 August 2017

A Wigan building contractor has appeared in court after exposing a homeowner and her family to asbestos while carrying out a garage conversion.

Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard that Anthony McGrath, trading as Winstanley Construction, carried out  asbestos removal work during the conversion when he was not licenced to do so and failed to carry out this work in a safe manner resulting in asbestos contamination in the ground floor of the house.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigation into the incident at Bassett Grove, Wigan found Mr McGrath had removed Asbestos Insulating Board ceiling panels from the garage, broken them up, and placed them in the garden for several days.  When the home owner queried what the boards were, she was told it was asbestos, but they were safe and would be removed soon.

After ringing the local council the home owner then contacted a licensed asbestos removal contractor who confirmed that the boards were Asbestos Insulating Board and should be removed under controlled conditions.  Asbestos contamination was found in several areas of the house and the householder was unable to re-enter the house for more than a week while a clean-up operation costing in excess of £12,000 was carried out.

Anthony McGrath of Winstanley Road, Billinge, Wigan pleaded guilty to breaches of Regulation 10 of the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 and Regulation 8 (1) of the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.He was fined £475 for each breach and ordered to pay a compensation order of £7,500.

Speaking after the hearing HSE Inspector David Norton said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by simply carrying out correct control measures and safe working practices. Companies and individuals should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards”.

Notes to Editors:

1.            The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It helps Great Britain work well by applying a broad range of regulatory interventions and scientific expertise, to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk

2.            More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/

3.            HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk