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Building company fined for putting childminder and children at risk

Date:
15 December 2016

A building company and its director have been fined for breaching Gas Safety law after putting a childminder and children in her care at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Plastic and Wood Specialists Ltd built a structure, that the childminder used to shelter sleeping babies and young children, around the flue outlet for the boiler. A carbon monoxide alarm sounded in the home and the gas supply was later disconnected by an emergency engineer from National Grid.

Northampton Magistrates’ Court heard that a gas boiler flue that had been previously installed in the childminders home was made unsafe by the structure as it affected the safety of the boiler.

HSE’s investigation found that the structure should not have been constructed in a way that partially enclosed the boiler flue. The flue should have been extended before the structure was completed. If dangerous levels of carbon monoxide had built up when these vulnerable children were in the structure there could have been multiple fatalities.

Plastic and Wood Specialists Ltd pleaded guilty of Regulation 8(1) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 were fined £40,000 with £1,419.10 in costs. Company director Alan John Wager pleaded guilty to Section 37 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and was given a 26 week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months with £1,419.10 in costs.

HSE Inspector Jenna McDade said: “Builders should be aware of the dangers arising from enclosing or partially enclosing a flue. As with this case, they would be at risk of breaching gas safety regulations even if they are not gas fitters. It is important to understand the risks before undertaking the work.”

For more information and guidance relating to domestic gas safety please go to http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/index.htm

Notes to editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. hse.gov.uk[2][1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ link to external website link to external website[3][2]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

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