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Testing company fined for failings in the way it carried out industrial radiography work

Date:
9 December 2015

A company that carries out non-destructive testing has been fined for failings in the way it carried out gamma radiography work at its site in Holmewood, Chesterfield.

Chesterfield Magistrates’ Court heard an employee of Applied Inspection Limited was carrying out gamma radiography work, during March and April 2014, when his passive personal radiation dosimeter (Thermo Luminescent Dosimeter / TLD badge) was found to have registered an overexposure, which was above the annual statutory limit.

The company and employee were unable to explain why the TLD badge came back with a high reading. Therefore, it cannot be ruled out that the employee did not receive a radiation overdose for the period in question.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that there were inadequate safeguarding standards for gamma radiography work in the enclosure being used in this incident. The other ‘gamma enclosures’ on site were found to have the correct guarding standards. Work procedures, risk assessments and local rules were also found to be insufficient.

Applied Inspection Limited, of Old Colliery Lane, Heath Road, Holmewood, Chesterfield, was fined a total of £5,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,914 after pleading guilty to an offence under Regulation 8(1) of the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999.

After the hearing HSE inspector Lyn Mizen said: “The basic principle on which the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 are based is that there is no safe dose of ionising radiation. Due to the hazards and risks associated with carrying out industrial radiography work it is critical that companies ensure that all aspects of it are carried out diligently and with the highest level of integrity, engineering safety devices and management control systems to enable the risks to be controlled to as low as reasonably practicable.”

For more information about ionising radiation visit: http://www.hse.gov.uk/radiation/ionising/

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

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